Met Office dismisses reports 'heat dome' will hit UK this month


The Met Office has bluntly dismissed reports of a so-called “heat dome” approaching the UK.

On Monday, a number of websites suggested the “heat dome” will hit the nation at the end of the month.

However, when approached by Yahoo News UK, the weather agency rejected these reports. “A ‘heat dome’ is not a meteorological term, nor are we predicting one,” it said.

The agency has become increasingly vocal against headlines predicting extreme weather events. “Talking about the weather is a national obsession in the UK,” it says in guidance, “making it a popular subject for the media.”

However, the guidance points out British weather “is not always exciting or extreme, meaning misleading or exaggerated headlines can appear at times”.

A man in London caught in the rain on Sunday. The Met Office said British weather is 'not always exciting'. (PA)A man in London caught in the rain on Sunday. The Met Office said British weather is 'not always exciting'. (PA)

A man in London caught in the rain on Sunday. The Met Office said British weather is ‘not always exciting’. (PA)

Addressing why it’s difficult to predict weather events such as heatwaves in the summer or snowstorms in the winter, the Met Office told Yahoo News: “When looking at forecasts beyond five days into the future, the chaotic nature of the atmosphere starts to come into play – small events currently over the Atlantic can have potentially significant impacts on our weather in the UK in several days’ time.

“Therefore, whilst we can still forecast the general feel of the weather to a relatively high level of accuracy using our ensemble models, it becomes harder to offer local detail to as high a level of accuracy as our shorter range forecasts.”

It’s likely to be wet this week.

Jason Kelly, chief meteorologist at the Met Office, said: “After a damp afternoon on Monday, a heavier band of rain moves in from the southwest in the evening, and as it moves northwards, the area of low pressure driving this rain becomes the dominant feature over the next few days.”

Yellow weather warnings for rain have been issued for the south west of England on Monday and Tuesday and Scotland on Tuesday and Wednesday, with the agency warning of disruption to infrastructure and public transport services.

The agency said there are “signs” of the weather improving, but it’s far from the so-called “heat dome” scenarios that have been circulating.

Met Office deputy chief meteorologist David Hayter said: “While there’s much uncertainty in the forecast at this range, there are some subtle signs of a more settled spell possibly developing, at least for a time, in the second half of July. It’s far too early to give any details on how this could develop, so it’s important to stay up to date with the latest forecast.”



Source link

About The Author

Scroll to Top